Putting off your education? Don’t!

pro·cras·ti·nate (verb) to put off till another day or time; defer; delay.
ma·ña·na  (Spanish noun) tomorrow; the (indefinite) future.
“I'll think about that tomorrow.” Scarlett O'Hara's famous last words in “Gone With The Wind” by Margaret Mitchell

I am the Queen of the Procrastinators. Every year on January first, I resolve to do my income tax returns as soon as those pesky forms arrive. And every year I flip the calendar to April and say, well, I won't go into what I say. Birthday cards? I buy them early, and maybe, just maybe, I'll mail them. Christmas presents are supposed to be wrapped in plastic grocery bags, right? Right? And don't even get me started on last year's vacation pictures that I was going to edit, caption, and upload to the cloud for everyone to see. In other words, I am too often like Scarlett – I put a hand to my forehead, close my eyes, and say, in a breathy Southern drawl - “I'll think about that tomorrow!”

Fortunately, one thing I didn't procrastinate about was my education. I started taking college courses way back before I joined the Navy (I wrote my papers on parchment paper with a quill pen, according to my smart-aleck sons). During my career, I used tuition assistance to take courses as my duties allowed, took a subject-specific GRE, and used ACE-recommended credits for my Navy training and experience. It may have taken me over 15 years, without much in the way of helpful education counseling I might add, but I finally put it all together in a degree plan and received my bachelor's degree. Not bad, considering my ‘mañana’ tendencies.

If I were to try the same thing today, it would go much, much easier. Now there are many programs and services in place that make the entire education process easier: SOC and MOUs ensure Service members’ credits transfer with them so that they don't have to repeat courses; the Joint Service Transcript (JST) and Air Force Community College of the Air Force (CCAF) transcript consolidate military training and experience into recommended credits that college institutions may apply to degree programs to reduce time and money for Service members; education counselors, both human and virtual, as well as agencies like DANTES, are available to help with every step of the way. Many resources, like OASC/CPST and the MWR Library, are in place with the sole purpose to help Service members reach their education goals. Service members no longer have to go it alone to reach their goals. Expert help is there for the asking.

So, to all you procrastinators out there - GET STARTED, if you haven't already. What are you waiting for? Meet with an education counselor, formulate a plan for your educational goal, move toward it, and don't wait until tomorrow! Tuition assistance is here now, but changes are in the wind. Downsizing is on the horizon. Take advantage of your education benefits NOW, while you still have them. No excuses. No 'mañana'. No “I'll think about that tomorrow.” Get started today!

Now, I'm off to mail my Valentine's Day cards. Maybe I'll add a note to say that they are for 2015 and be early for a change!

For valuable education resources, check out the Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support (DANTES) Web site http://www.dantes.doded.mil/index.html.

Nancy Hamilton, DANTES Editor

New DSST Exam Launches in 2014

cyber-security
It is hard to think of any aspect of our daily lives that is not impacted by potential threats to cyberspace. Organizations spend billions of dollars each year to protect sensitive data and resources, yet hardly a day passes without news of a cyber-attack with resulting loss of business or personal data. Prometric is pleased to announce the launch of a new upper-level DSST exam in early 2014 - Fundamentals of Cybersecurity. Students can earn 3 ACE recommended semester hours of upper-level college credit if they take this exam and pass it. Fundamentals of Cybersecurity, includes content related to major topics in Cybersecurity including Application and Systems Security, Implementing Authentication and Authorization Technologies, Compliance, security pertaining to networks and physical environments and vulnerability management. The upper-level exam will be available in early 2014 and more information will be made available once the exam is launched.

How can this exam be used? Well there are a variety of Information Technology and Cybersecurity degrees and certificates available. Military members should contact their local or virtual education center counselor to find out which certificate or degree program is right for them and if taking this exam will be beneficial. This exam may be applied to other degrees as well. Your counselor will guide you through which CLEP and/or DSST exams will help you earn college credit while saving on college costs and reducing your time to degree completion. For more information on Cybersecurity careers check out http://dantespulse.com/?p=1253.

Here is a 1 minute video to show you how taking a DSST College Credit Exam can help you.

 

 

 

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